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Employees’ Perception of their Employers’ Preparedness for Natural Disasters

Dr. Abdul-Akeem Sadiq
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
801 West Michigan Street, BS 4070
Indianapolis, IN 46202
Email: asadiq@indiana.edu
Phone: 317-278-1013

  

Dr. John Graham
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
SPEA Room 300, IU Bloomington
1315 E 10th St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
Email: grahamjd@indiana.edu
Phone: 812-855-1432

Kevin Tharp
Indiana University Center for Survey Research
Eigenmann Hall 2-S
1900 E. 10th St.
Bloomington, IN 47406
Email: kwtharp@indiana.edu
Phone: 812-855-4707

Project Description

In the article “Exploring the Predictors of Organizational Preparedness for Natural Disasters,” which was recently accepted for publication in Risk Analysis, the authors explored the predictors of organizational preparedness for natural disasters. Since leaders of organizations have an incentive to overstate their level of preparedness and because surveys of organizational leaders suffer from selection bias and low response rates, the authors interviewed employees about the organizations that employ them. Using an online survey, they collected information from a national sample of 2,008 U.S. employees and estimated the predictors of preparedness at the organizational level. They find, among other results, that organization size (facility-level) is a consistent predictor of natural disaster preparedness. The authors conclude with policy recommendations and outline an agenda for future research on organizational preparedness for natural disasters.

Project Objectives

Objective 1. To understand the antecedents of natural disaster preparedness at the organizational level.

Objective 2. To compare citizens' risk perceptions of different activities and technologies (e.g., playing football and living near a nuclear power plant).

Objective 3. To compare citizens' perceptions of natural disasters to actuarial data on natural disasters.

Objective 4. To have a better understanding of the factors that influence individual risk perceptions for natural disasters.